bginfo and group policy preferences

2013-03-01

After you download BgInfo and get your configuration file created you can easily create a GPO using Group Policy Preferences to have it load on any computer on your domain.   Copy the BgInfo.exe and your config.bgi to \your.domain\NETLOGON share. Create a new GPO and goto Computer > Preferences > Windows Settings > Files Right and click and goto New > File Under Action make sure it says Update Under source file put “\your.domain\NETLOGON\Bginfo.exe” Under destination file put “C:\Program Files\BgInfo\Bginfo.exe” Click OK to close and then repeat step 3 to add another file Again under Action make sure it says Update Under source file put “\your.domain\NETLOGON\yourConfig.bgi” Under destination file put “C:\Program Files\BgInfo\yourConfig.bgi” Click OK to close Now back in the GPO window goto the Registry section (Computer > Preferences > Windows Settings > Registry) Right and click and goto New > Registry Item Under Action make sure it says Update Change Hive to “HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE” For key path add “SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run” For Value Name add “BgInfo” For Value Type set it to “REG_SZ” In Value Data put (including the quotes) “C:\Program Files\BgInfo\Bginfo.exe” “C:\Program Files\BgInfo\yourConfig.bgi” /silent /timer:0 /NOLICPROMPT” Your GPO is now ready, add a scope and test it out.

my recent job interviewing experience

2013-01-16

I’m happy to say that I’ve just accepted a position with a great company and will be relocating to Chicago for it.  I started looking for a job pretty seriously about 8 months ago after having been with a previous employer over six years (my first job out of college).  I actually accepted a new position about 3 months ago, and now I’m leaving it. Yes I know in the traditional sense this looks bad, but does it really?  Beyond my initial call with the recruiter, the job I’m taking now they didn’t seem to care I had only been there a short time.  Hell when I did my first phone interview it hadn’t even been a month! In the last 8 months I’ve done probably 30 phone interviews (including multiple with the same potential employer), I’ve had 3 in person interviews (all of which I was offered the job), and sent my resume out to over 50 job advertisements.  I’m not posting this to brag, but rather to share my experiences in the recent job hunt and maybe give some advice.  I’ve interviewed with some big companies (Amazon Web Services) and lots of smaller to medium sized ones too, and for the most part it was a similar experience across the board. I’m a SysAdmin if you don’t know already so that’s the type of jobs I’ve been applying for.  All the initial phone interviews are the same.  Always a technical benchmark, with mostly straightforward answers with the occasional open ended or “what would you do” type of scenario question.  These are the minimum barrier of entry, weed out the crap type interviews, and I can only remember one from a security company that was difficult for me because quite honestly the job was out of my league (they called me back and said no thanks).  If you are applying for a job you better be able to answer questions on every single technology they list in the advertisement because you can pretty much count on being asked about each during a phone interview. What I learned most was that personality is everything.  Today there are so many IT professionals and, especially with big companies, the only thing to differentiate you from everyone else is your personality.  There is always someone better and smarter than you, so if you can meet the qualifications, speak with confidence, and mesh well with the team you stand a good chance.  I talked to several employers who complained of finding very smart people, but they always ended up being egotistical jerks.  If you’re an IT guy with a big ego and you’re looking for a job you better learn to tone it down or I can guarantee you won’t land your dream gig for awesome_startup_01.  Nobody wants to work with you no matter how good you are, and they know there are at least 5 other people out there with a similar skill-set to yours who aren’t assholes.  The exception being if the job is in some rural craphole, but then again that probably isn’t your dream job.  At least try and wait 6 months before you turn into a jerk at your new job, don’t scoff at interview questions or try to show anyone up.  They won’t be impressed, they won’t call you back.  Speak with confidence, but not with attitude.   The other important thing I learned is that people really only look for the job requirements within your resume.  First line HR types will screen it looking for key information matching the required section of the job ad.  The hiring manager will probably read it all, but everyone else will skim picking out what they want to quiz you on or what they care about most (usually where the most help is needed).  Same goes for the cover letter.  I can only recall one person mentioning something I put in my cover letter.  Not to say that they aren’t reading it and that you shouldn’t put effort into it because if you have spelling mistakes or write like a 3rd grader you’ll probably get filtered, but more to the point that you need to really make sure you are targetting the skills they are interested in inside them.  I thought I had a couple cool things on my resume, and out of all the places I talked to not once were they brought up in any capacity.  The first was a Research Grant I was awarded from a university (I think it’s cool and it’s IT security related), and the other was a time when I was invited to MS headquarters in Redmond as a “Subject Matter Expert.”  These are two things you won’t find on everyone’s resume and I was expecting SOMEONE to mention them, but nope never.  The hiring teams/panels only care about what you will do for them and their immediate needs.   My last bit of advice is to listen carefully during phone interviews and take note of the questions they are asking.  Repeatedly asked SQL or VMware questions?  They likely need help there badly.  Pick up on that and be ready to use that if you’re invited for an in-person interview to capitalize on it.  Then when they inevitably ask you what you bring to the table or what makes you stand out you can say, “It sounds like you guys really need someone with VMware experience and…”   I guess the short version of my ramblings is this: (resume focused on the job advertisement + demonstrated knowledge to backup claims + ability to pick up on employers needs and ask pointed/relevant questions back + confidence factor) * (personality index) = chance of success for obtaining job

script to launch armitage teamserver quickly

2013-01-10

Quickly launch an Armitage teamserver with the servers IP address (eth0 by default, modify the script accordingly) automatically detected and with a pre-set password:

#!/bin/bash echo “launching multiplayer hacking ;)” echo “…”

ipaddr=ip addr show eth0 | grep -w “inet” | gawk ’{ print $2 }’ | cut -f1 -d\/ echo “IP is $ipaddr” echo “…”

cd /opt/metasploit/msf3/data/armitage/ /opt/metasploit/msf3/data/armitage/teamserver $ipaddr password

install adb driver for nexus 7 on windows

2012-12-26

If you have a Nexus 7 and you are following the developer.android.com tutorial and trying to run your first Android app you may be wondering why ADT won’t see your device.  Thanks to this helpful article I found the solution: In ADT go to the ‘Window’ menu at the top and then select ‘‘Android SDK Manager’ from the dropdown.  A new window should open and start loading available things to download. Under the ‘‘Extras’ section, look for ‘‘Google USB Driver’ then install it by ticking the box and clicking “Install packages…”. Go to Device Manager in Windows and you should see your Nexus under ‘‘Other devices’ with a yellow exclamation mark indicating its missing a driver.  Right click on it and choose ‘‘Update driver software’.  When it asks for the driver location it will be in your ADT bundle directory at ”adt-bundle-windows\sdk\extras\google\usb_driver”. Finish through the driver wizard and plug in your Nexus 7.  Be sure USB debugging is enabled.

sccm wmi queries (wql) for building collections containing only all servers or all workstations

2012-12-14

If you want to build a collection in SCCM for “All Servers” or “All Workstations” here are two WMI queries you can use. All Servers

select SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceID,SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceType,SMS_R_SYSTEM.Name,SMS_R_SYSTEM.SMSUniqueIdentifier,SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceDomainORWorkgroup,SMS_R_SYSTEM.Client from SMS_R_System inner join SMS_G_System_SYSTEM on SMS_G_System_SYSTEM.ResourceId = SMS_R_System.ResourceId where SMS_G_System_SYSTEM.SystemRole = “Server”

All Workstations/Desktops

select SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceID,SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceType,SMS_R_SYSTEM.Name,SMS_R_SYSTEM.SMSUniqueIdentifier,SMS_R_SYSTEM.ResourceDomainORWorkgroup,SMS_R_SYSTEM.Client from SMS_R_System inner join SMS_G_System_SYSTEM on SMS_G_System_SYSTEM.ResourceId = SMS_R_System.ResourceId where SMS_G_System_SYSTEM.SystemRole = “Workstation”